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Issue: Issue no. 5: winter 2014

Wildely Reflective Works: An Analysis of Ovid’s “Echo and Narcissus” and Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray

Wildely Reflective Works: An Analysis of Ovid’s “Echo and Narcissus” and Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray

An essay by Beatrice Glickman For Prof. Liana Bellon’s course entitled Introduction to College English      Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray and Ovid’s “Echo and Narcissus” both explore the theme of self-obsession. Narcissus and Dorian both become obsessed with their beauty: Narcissus with his reflection and Dorian with his portrait. However, Dorian’s self-obsession becomes deeper than that of Narcissus because he sees the painting as an external expression of his conscience (class notes). Furthermore, Narcissus’ fate is predetermined by…

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How Unions Shape the Construction Industry in Quebec

How Unions Shape the Construction Industry in Quebec

Jean-Sebastien Gagnier For Prof. Jeffrey Gandell’s course entitled Non-Fiction Writing       Our road network is falling apart.  So is our construction industry.         You are driving on one of Montreal’s roads while it is under construction.  You get into the construction zone and have to slow down to merge from three lanes into two.  As you peek through the construction drums you see five workers around a hole watching the youngest shoveling and sweating.  You now wonder: why are they all standing there…

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Marina Abramovic: The Artist is Present

Marina Abramovic: The Artist is Present

 An essay by Sara Capanna For Prof. Robin Feenstra’s course entitled Drama             “After forty years of being told that you’re insane and that you belong in a mental hospital, you finally get all of the acknowledgements.” This is one of the first things said by performing artist, Marina Abramovic, also known as ‘the grandmother of performing arts’ in her documentary about her latest piece, The Artist is Present. She is referring to the notion that the performing arts have…

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True Love and the Foil in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre

True Love and the Foil in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre

An essay by Fredric Lam For Prof. Marie-Thérèse Blanc’s course entitled Love Among the Ruins Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre is the story of the eponymous young woman who searches for true love after an unfortunate childhood. Jane’s marriage to Edward Rochester is disrupted and, refusing to be his mistress, she flees and encounters St John Rivers. St John teaches Jane that true love is the ultimate goal that will truly fulfill all her needs and wants. She learns from St…

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The Ruins of Usher and de la Poer

The Ruins of Usher and de la Poer

An essay by Alyssa Lamberti For Prof. K. Woofter’s course entitled American Gothic           The repression of disturbing secrets or truths, as well as the complete collapse of the self due to the resurfacing of repressed material, are common elements found in gothic literature. Stories such as Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher” and H.P. Lovecraft’s “The Rats in the Walls” incorporate both figurative and literal ruins to represent secrets and fears that have been purposely…

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Journey Prize Nominee

Journey Prize Nominee

An essay by Sahib Al-shemeri For Prof. Sarah Gilbert’s course entitled Introduction to College English                 The short story, an art form often misunderstood for being appropriate only for the pages of magazines, needs blockbuster successes to cement its place as a respectable literary form. That is why the Journey Prize should champion the stories that best embody the virtues of a good short story. The best stories hint at the subtle changes in a character’s understanding of their world….

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The Walls

The Walls

  A Personal Essay By Bogdan Stilmashenko For Prof. Tracie Gemmel’s course entitled Rhetorical Strategies       When all was said and done, the new room still looked empty; a bed and a bookshelf did little against the callousness of the white old walls. And never did I manage to soften the space; make it more appealing. This room must have wished to be a prison cell.      This two-month trial of living in the city hadn’t been planned as an…

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