The 2023 issue of the Dawson English Journal is here!  Enjoy essays on poetry, theatre, fiction, film, and more. Many thanks to our diligent student editors, student authors, faculty advisers, and you, our readers!

Issue No. 14: Winter 2023

FEATURED

Five Little Indians: A Tale of Resilience, by Zoe Longtin

Five Little Indians: A Tale of Resilience, by Zoe Longtin

The first chapter, “Prologue,” shows the hopeful side of the incredibly sad tale that is Five Little Indians. The circle imagery, the reference to birch trees, and the warmth of the setting all work together to strengthen the theme of resilience.

Frankenstein: A Tale of Humanity, the Monster, the Other, and the Mirror by Angélique Babineau

Frankenstein: A Tale of Humanity, the Monster, the Other, and the Mirror by Angélique Babineau

Frankenstein, as registered in Jeffrey Jerome Cohen’s work “Monster Culture (Seven Theses),” affirms that monsters are a product of culture. Monsters are not about differences; they are mirrors. They reflect our worst fears and desires and, whether we are ready to accept it or not, we are monster-makers creating extensions of ourselves, as the Creature is of Victor.

Reconciliation’s Unconcluded Epilogue in Five Little Indians by Sarah Orejuela

Reconciliation’s Unconcluded Epilogue in Five Little Indians by Sarah Orejuela

Indeed, Good’s paradoxical placing of an epilogue in Five Little Indians’ “Prologue” foreshadows the initial process of closure on the lasting impacts of the Canadian Indian residential school system on Indigenous students and their families.

Confessing Within the Stories of Others: How the Long Lines in “Howl” Allow the Speaker to Confess, by Hannah Dane

Confessing Within the Stories of Others: How the Long Lines in “Howl” Allow the Speaker to Confess, by Hannah Dane

About Hannah Dane: I am in the Literature Profile of the ALC program. I wrote this essay for my Confessional Literature class, which centred on nonfiction works of personal revelation. Amongst the pieces we read, “Howl,” a poem published in 1956, written by Beat poet Allen Ginsberg, intrigued me the most. A strenuously long and controversial piece, the length of the lines in “Howl” inspired me to analyze how a specific form choice could play with the central theme of…

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Behind Every Macbeth There is a Lady, by Emmy Rubin

Behind Every Macbeth There is a Lady, by Emmy Rubin

The existence of Lady Macbeth enriches the play by provoking a discussion about the truths pertaining to gender constructs, drawing connections between the mortal world and the supernatural, and controlling the transformation of the Macbeths’ marriage on a micro as well as a macrocosmic level.

Expectations and Emotions in Catherine Chandler’s “Coming to Terms” by Emilie Exler

Expectations and Emotions in Catherine Chandler’s “Coming to Terms” by Emilie Exler

Through her approach to the Shakespearean sonnet form, as well as her use of juxtaposition and rich connotative language, Chandler brings awareness to readers about the emotional and psychological impacts of miscarriage while criticizing the harsh expectations put on grieving mothers to quickly heal from their trauma.

Literary Devices and Short Stories In Exploring Relationship Issues   by Samy Lazzouzi

Literary Devices and Short Stories In Exploring Relationship Issues   by Samy Lazzouzi

“Reunion” by John Cheever stands out as a deeply melancholic narrative expertly wrapped in a seemingly lighter tale through the use of numerous literary devices and writing tactics. To be more specific, the author employs irony, indirect characterization, and the first-person point of view to make the event feel both more real and less mentally taxing at the same time.