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An Analysis of Gabriel’s Self-Estrangement in James Joyce’s “The Dead”

An Analysis of Gabriel’s Self-Estrangement in James Joyce’s “The Dead”

Written by Sam Fisher for Prof. Liana Bellon James Joyce’s “The Dead” explores the theme of being alienated from one’s self. Gabriel, the main character in “The Dead,” is a member of the Irish upper class in early twentieth-century Dublin. Despite being surrounded by a rather conservative family and group of friends, Gabriel identifies himself as progressive, does not believe in class distinctions, and promotes the idea of leaving Ireland to explore the modern world. However, through an analysis of…

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Hunger and Gender: Attitudes towards Performativity

Hunger and Gender: Attitudes towards Performativity

Written by Matthew Iakov Liberman for Prof. Kristopher Woofter Hunger and Gender: Attitudes towards Performativity And I eat men like air. —“Lady Lazarus” Poststructuralism has long been concerned with the alluring failure of representation, as succinctly vocalized by Faulkner’s Addie Bundren: “words are no good,” she plainly states; “[they don’t] ever fit even what they are trying to say at” (171). The “performance art” of Franz Kafka’s “A Hunger Artist” (1922) seems unrelated—until considered through that fracturing  insight—to David Henry…

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The Two Towers by J. R. R. Tolkien: The Fulfillment of Prophecies

The Two Towers by J. R. R. Tolkien: The Fulfillment of Prophecies

Written by Emmanuelle Dastous Sara for Prof. Rebecca Million Behold! A victory may only come upon a land with the guidance and strength of its people. Yet certain prophecies must be fulfilled for the assurance of a victory. This concept was clearly portrayed in J. R. R. Tolkien’s second installment of Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers. The beauty of Middle Earth is slowly perishing and the darkness within is emerging throughout the land. Middle Earth is slowly dying…

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Tragic Hero? THAT is the Question

Tragic Hero? THAT is the Question

An essay by Sara Capanna For Prof. Feenstra’s course entitled Drama Tragedy is a genre of theater that has existed for thousands of years. Like the name suggests, happiness is not a prominent feature in these productions. The protagonists of these plays are known as tragic heroes. But what constitutes a tragic hero? In the words of Joseph Kelly, a tragic hero is defined as follows: Someone who begins in a state of prosperity, comes into contact with a force…

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An Analysis of Gabriel’s Self-Estrangement in James Joyce’s “The Dead”

An Analysis of Gabriel’s Self-Estrangement in James Joyce’s “The Dead”

Written by Sam Fisher for Prof. Liana Bellon James Joyce’s “The Dead” explores the theme of being alienated from one’s self. Gabriel, the main character in “The Dead,” is a member of the Irish upper class in early twentieth-century Dublin. Despite being surrounded by a rather conservative family and group of friends, Gabriel identifies himself as progressive, does not believe in class distinctions, and promotes the idea of leaving Ireland to explore the modern world. However, through an analysis of…

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The Inevitable Monstrosity of Innovative Design

The Inevitable Monstrosity of Innovative Design

Written by Meghan Dove For Prof. Shalon Noble Graphic design is a combination of advertising, fine art, and typography with an emphasis on giving “order to information, form to ideas, [and] expression and feeling to artifacts that document human experience” (Meggs 588). In the graphic design industry, Fibonacci sequences, the golden ratio, and fractal patterns greatly influence the forms of letters in typography, the proportion of page layout in book design, and the hierarchy of printed posters. Deviations from industry…

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Easy to Find? Speech Language Pathologists are like Needles in a Haystack

Easy to Find? Speech Language Pathologists are like Needles in a Haystack

Written by Esfir Tkach for Prof. Jeffrey Gandell Why me? Why wasn’t I good enough? Guilt overwhelmed me. The fear of any type of communication made my body tremble and sweat. The fear of laughter or rejection made my anxiety ever more noticeable. I found myself stuck in an eternal loophole. The same exact routine day after day. School was never something I looked forward to. At 8 am, I would come to school, and would sit down at the…

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Erasing the Lines Between Economics, Equality, and Health

Erasing the Lines Between Economics, Equality, and Health

Written by Cheyenne Thomas  For Prof. Tavish McDonell On a pack of cigarettes, we have a gruesome warning label, informing us of the health consequences we expose ourselves to when we smoke. When buying packaged and processed foods, we have a nutritional label at our disposal, to allow us to decide for ourselves if we want to fill up on calorie-dense foods with little to no nutritional value. We have ad campaign posters lining the hallways of maternity units, informing…

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Be Who You Wanna Be, B-A-R-B-I-E

Be Who You Wanna Be, B-A-R-B-I-E

Written by Jamie Sterlin for Prof. Neil Hartlen In the science fiction stories “Options” and “The Barbie Murders,” John Varley discusses the novum of body modification through opposing points of view. In “Options,” the author suggests that body modification can be a safe way to explore one’s gender and / or sexuality while still remaining oneself, if one takes into account their loved ones. However, “The Barbie Murders” explores a world where extreme body modification can end up causing issues…

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